Suspended Water

Suspended Water

This model was all about suspending water and land around themselves. It is an extension of the previous models. This time, it is the plane of liquid and the mass of the earth that is being moved and floats. The pieces are suspended and pulled taught by thin wire. The focus is to be on how it curves the planes of the water. After that, the wire pulls the mass of the land up and off the ground. The water is literally being bent and now supports the land in the air. The wire connects to the land along the shoreline only. This results in a tight connection and sturdy mass near the water, but the further away areas of the land are more free.

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Outline for Materiality

Materiality

The quality or character of being material or composed of matter is Materiality.

My theoretical concept is the study of the temporal and physical properties of materiality and how to best utilize them. Form is often at the forefront of design. Materiality is an afterthought. This neglects the material potential of the logic applied to the design. To do so is to miss out on half of what architecture is. Every single characteristic and element of an object is its materiality. Matter makes up everything. Because of this, materiality defined seemingly empty spaces.

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Rethinking Land

What is land?

What do you think land is? Follow up question: where do you think buildings go? Buildings are always grounded in the… well, the ground. But back to my first question, what is land to you? Because the real answer to the second question is very dependent on the first. What we think of where we put buildings greatly defines the buildings themselves. If we view the plane on which the building rests as something more dynamic than just “the ground” we suddenly have a huge playing field to develop on. This means air, suspension, underground,  stilts, and water. Now, obviously a lot of this already exists, but I feel like it is neglected.

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